Speakers

Artificial Photosynthesis with Bioinorganic Catalysts

카라브렌
Kara L. Bren
University of Rochester
Dec. 1 09:30~10:15

Abstract

Artificial photosynthesis is the capture and conversion of light energy to drive the formation of fuels. In this talk, systems for artificial photosynthesis that incorporate biomolecular catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction will be presented. These systems are notable for functioning under mild conditions in water, using visible light, and, in some cases, reaching high turnover numbers. Hydrogen evolution catalysts to be presented include metallopeptides, engineered cytochromes, metalloporphyrin-peptide conjugates, and fully synthetic metalloproteins. Catalysts are designed to utilize strategies identified in metalloenzymes including the use of intramolecular proton shuttles and second-sphere interactions to tune active-site reactivity. The catalysts are developed and studied using electrochemistry to optimize reaction conditions and measure efficiency (overpotential) and turnover frequency. Electrochemical analysis also yields information on the mechanisms by which these catalysts assemble protons and electrons to yield hydrogen. To create systems for artificial photosynthesis, the catalysts are combined with molecular dyes or water-soluble quantum dots as photosensitizers. The best-performing photocatalytic systems using quantum dots yield turnover numbers for hydrogen production in excess of 100,000 with respect to catalyst. Prospects for further understanding and enhancing activity will be discussed.

General References

  1. Banu Kandemir, Saikat Chakraborthy, Yixing Guo, and Kara L. Bren* “Semisynthetic and Biomolecular Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts” Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55, 467-477. DOI: 10.1021/acs.inorgchem.5b02054. Research article in Forum on Small Molecule Activation: From Biological Principles to Energy Applications.
  2. Kara L. Bren* “Multidisciplinary Approaches to Solar Hydrogen” J. Royal Soc. Interface 2015, 5, 1-12. ID: 20140091. 3.
  3. Jesse G. Kleingardner and Kara L. Bren* “Biological Significance and Applications of Heme c Proteins and Peptides: Acc. Chem. Res. 2015, 48, 1845-1852.

 

Education

  • • 2008-Present, Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 2003-2008, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 1997-2003, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 1998-Present, Member of Biophysics, Structural and Computational Biology Cluster, University of Rochester
    Research: Analysis of electronic structure and
    electron transfer activity of heme proteins,
    spectroscopic investigation of folding and
    dynamics of heme proteins, development of
    bioinspired assemblies for solar fuels.
    • 1996-1997, NIH Postdoctoral Fellow,
    University of California at Davis
    Research: NMR studies of electronic and
    molecular structure of P. furiosus ferredoxin
    Research Advisor: Gerd N. La Mar

Professional Career

  • 2008-Present, Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 2003-2008, Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 1997-2003, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of Rochester
  • 1998-Present, Member of Biophysics, Structural and Computational Biology Cluster, University of Rochester
    Research: Analysis of electronic structure and electron transfer activity of heme proteins, spectroscopic investigation of folding and dynamics of heme proteins, development of bioinspired assemblies for solar fuels.
  • 1996-1997, NIH Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California at Davis
    Research: NMR studies of electronic and molecular structure of P. furiosus ferredoxin Research Advisor: Gerd N. La Mar

 

Awards and Honors

  • 2017, Kavli Lecturer
  • 2017, Humphrey Lecturer, University of Vermont
  • 2016, Visiting Lecturer, Chemistry Promotion Center, Taiwan
  • 2016, Visiting Scholar, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan
  • 2014, Guest Professor of Biochemistry, Lund University, Sweden
  • 2006, American Chemical Society PROGRESS/Dreyfus Lectureship Award
  • 2003-2005, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow
  • 2004, Paul Saltman Memorial Lecturer
  • 1996-1997, National Research Service Award (NIH Post-doctoral Fellow)
  • 1992-1995, Eastman/Kodak Graduate Fellow
  • 1991-1992, Special Institute Fellow, Caltech
  • 1991, Nominated to Phi Beta Kappa
  • 1991, Nominated to Sigma Xi
  • 1991, Franz Exner Award for Excellence in Chemistry
  • 1990, Technology Policy Studies Fellow (Carleton College; sponsored by Sloan Foundation)