Speakers

Synaptic Sensing and Modulation by Microglia: A Role in Neurodegeneration

Brian A. MacVicar
Brian A. MacVicar
Univ. of British Columbia, Canada
13:10~13:55, November 21st, 2014

Abstract :

Microglia, the immune glia of the brain, are known to be dynamic cells constantly surveying the health of the surrounding tissue and responding to damage with rapid process extension.  In addition microglia processes are responsible for pruning synapses via a mechanism requiring complement receptor 3 (CR3).  Dr. MacVicar will present work from his lab describing how microglia detect the activation of NMDA receptors in neurons via the intermediate release of ATP.  In addition he will describe how microglia CR3 activation and ROS generation is a novel trigger for long term depression of synaptic activity when combined with tissue hypoxia. These data suggest how microglia dysfunction could contribute to synaptic impairment during neurodegeneration.

 

Awards and Honors

  • 2003-2017  : Tier I Canada Research Chair in Neuroscience
  • 2007  : Killam Research Prize and elected Fellow, Royal Society of Canada
  • 2003-2008 : Michael Smith Distinguished Scholar Award
  • 1993-2003 : Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Scientist
  • 1997-2002 : Medical Research Council Senior Scientist
  • 1988-1993 : Medical Research Council Scientist
  • 1983-1993 : Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Scholar
  • 1980-1982 : Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • 1979-1980 : Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Postdoctoral Scholarship
  • 1988 : A. Stephenson Visiting Professorship
  • 1986 : Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship